Types Of Tetras

28 Most Colorful and Amazing Significant Types of Tetras

Most people know that tetra fish are small, peaceful fish that make great additions to any aquarium.

What many people don’t know, however, is that there are actually many different types of tetras, each with their own unique appearance and personality.

In this guide, we’ll take a look at some of the most popular types of tetras to help you decide which one is right for your aquarium.

28  Fascinating Types of Tetras Everyone Should Know

There are many different species of tetras, all of them have their own unique appearance and set of behaviors. 

This section will discuss some of the most popular types of tetras.

1. Congo Tetra (Phenacogrammus Interruptus)

The Congo Tetra is a freshwater fish native to the Congo Basin in Africa.

It is a popular aquarium fish known for its iridescent blue coloration and its black vertical stripes.

These species grow to a length of about 3 inches (7.5 cm) and have a lifespan of 3-5 years.

The temperature requirements for the Congo tetra are between 74 to 82 °F, while the PH should ideally fall between 6.0 to 6.5.

The Congo tetra is known to be a good community fish and can be kept with other peaceful species, they are also omnivores species, and their diet should consist of both meaty and plant-based foods. 

Although Congo tetras are hardy species and are not difficult to care for, they require clean water and a balanced diet. 

In general, it is a good choice for beginner aquarists.

2. BlackTetra (Gymnocorymbus ternetzi)

The black tetra (Gymnocorymbus ternetzi) is a freshwater fish native to South America.

They are found in the Paraguay River Basin, Brazil, and even in Argentina.

These species have a variety of names, such as Black Widow Tetra, Petticoat Tetra, and Blackamoor. 

They are members of the characin family (Characidae) and are closely related to other tetras, such as the white tetra and the neon tetra. 

The typical length of a Black Skirt Tetra when it reaches full maturity is about 2-2.5 inches.

It’s best to maintain your Black Tetra’s water temperature at around 70°F to 85°F (in the middle of this range).

Also, a pH level between 6.0 and 7.5 is necessary.

Black tetras are Omnivores and will eat most aquarium foods.

Additionally, they are peaceful, easy to care for, and can get along well with other tank mates. 

Just keep them in groups of six or more because they are schooling fish.

3. Bloodfin Tetra (Aphyocharax Anisitsi)

The Bloodfin Tetra is a freshwater fish native to South America, especially in Argentina and some rivers in Brazil.

These omnivores species are popular aquarium fish and are known for their vibrant red coloration.

They are peaceful fish that do well in community tanks; also, they should be kept in groups of six or more since they are schooling fish.

To keep these fish happy, the aquarium’s temperature should be between 18 and 28 degrees Celsius, with a pH of 6.5 to 8.

Bloodfin Tetras are a perfect choice for beginners. They can survive in pretty much any freshwater tank.

However, they require clean water, and if you skip them too often, they will get sick fast.

4. Pristella / X-Ray Tetra (Pristella maxillaris)

Pristella maxillaris, also known as the X-Ray Tetra or Pristella Tetra, is a small freshwater fish native to South America.

X-Ray Tetras are typically about 2 inches long and have a silver body with a black stripe running from the nose to the tail.

They also have a bright red stripe that runs along the sides of their body.

These species are omnivorous and will eat both plant and animal matter, so feeding them will not be a hard task.

Also, if you have other species in your aquarium, don’t worry, they can be kept in a community aquarium with other peaceful fish.

However, it is a must to provide them with a suitable tank, a 20 gallon (75 liters) aquarium is a good size for a small group of these fish.

Additionally, it is recommended to provide them with water parameters they deserve. Their ideal water temperature is between 64°F and 82°F (about 75 degrees) with pH from 5.8 to 8.5 (Between 6.0 to 7.5 is perfect).

They are egg-layers. They will lay their eggs on plant leaves or other surfaces in the aquarium, so be prepared for some baby tetras.

These active fish have a lifespan of four to five years.

5. GloFish Tetra

Glofish is a type of fish that is known for its bright colors and is available in different colors, such as

  • Starfire Red
  • Electric Green
  • Sunburst Orange 
  • Cosmic Blue 
  • Galactic Purple
  • Moonrise Pink

They are tropical fish that can’t survive in non-tropical climates; also, they need to be kept in schools of at least six fish.

These peaceful fish get along with most other types of fish, but they might nip the fins of slow-moving tank mates like Bettas.

Their water temperature should be between 72 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit, and the pH level of water should be between 6.8 and 7.8.

They are easy to care for and make a great addition to any freshwater aquarium; they are not picky eaters and will eat most types of food.

6. Bucktooth Tetra (Exodon paradoxus)

The Bucktooth Tetra is a popular fish found in the Amazon River Basin and Guyana areas.

This small, colorful fish is a member of the Characidae family and can grow up to 3 inches long.

The color combination of E. paradoxus is stunning: a brilliant, metallic-silver foundation complemented with yellowfins with orange and red tips.

And there are casts of yellow, red, and green throughout the body.

Along with the aforementioned yellow markings, there are also two prominent black spots just below the body, at the base of the tail.

It prefers a warm, tropical environment and requires a well-oxygenated tank with plenty of plants and hiding places.

The proper water temperature for a Bucktooth Tetra is 72-82 degrees Fahrenheit with a pH level of 6.2 to 7.4.

To keep the fish healthy and avoid stressing them, make sure your water parameters are constant.

The Bucktooth Tetra is a peaceful fish that gets along well with other community fish.

However, it can be aggressive towards similar fish in size and appearance.

If you keep more than one Bucktooth Tetra in your aquarium, it is best to have at least four of them so they can form their social group.

The Bucktooth Tetra is a beautiful addition to any aquarium and will bring a splash of color to your tank.

7. Cardinal Tetra (Paracheirodon Axelrodi)

The Cardinal Tetra (Paracheirodon axelrodi) is a freshwater fish native to the upper Orinoco and Negro Rivers in South America.

Cardinals are small fish, typically reaching only 2-3 inches in length.

They have a bright red color with a blue stripe along their sides.

The water temperature they enjoy is between 73 and 81 degrees Fahrenheit (23 and 27 degrees Celsius) with a pH of 4.6 to 6.2.

These fish require high vitamin levels in their diet; thus, at least 75 percent of it should be high-quality flake food.

And since they are omnivorous, feeding them will not be such a difficult task.

Live and frozen foods are especially popular with this species.

They are schooling fish and should be kept in groups of at least six individuals; also, they are peaceful fish and can be kept with most other community fish.

You can enjoy this fish for about four to five years.

8. Bleeding Heart Tetra (Hyphessobrycon Erythrostigma)

The Bleeding Heart Tetras are a beautiful fish that makes a great addition to any home aquarium.

They originate from the Orinoco River to the Rio Negro tributary of the Amazon River.

They have a deep red body with a bright white heart-shaped patch on their side.

These tiny fish grow only to around 2.5 inches in length.

Bleeding Heart Tetras thrive in a temperature range of 60°F to 80°F, and they require a pH level between 6.5 and 7.

They are omnivores that are also adaptable feeders, and this implies they will 

actively seek food and aren’t particular about what they eat.

However, be aware that you must not overfeed them because unclean water will expose your fish to disease and unhappiness.

These attractive fish are peaceful and easy to care for, making them a popular choice for beginners and experienced aquarists.

Also, they can live up to 5 years.

9. Red Eye Tetra (Moenkhausia Sanctaefilomenae)

Red eye tetras are tropical freshwater fish belonging to the Characidae family.

They are native to the rivers of western Brazil, eastern Peru, Paraguay, and eastern Bolivia.

These fish are named for their striking red eyes.

Red eye tetras are peaceful, schooling fish that should be kept in a group of at least six individuals.

The ideal water temperature can range between 73 and 82 degrees Fahrenheit with a PH of between 5.5 and 8.5.

If you meet these water parameters in your tank, they will grow to a length of around 2.7-2.8 inches (6 cm) and live for three to five years.

Further, they are omnivores and will consume a wide range of foods.

They graze on worms and insects; however, in your tank, you can offer them fine flake food, live or freeze-dried brine shrimp, Daphnia, tubifex, and frozen or freeze-dried bloodworms in captivity.

In general, these fish are peaceful and suitable for most community aquariums.

10. Neon Tetras (Paracheirodon Innesi)

Neon Tetras are one of the most popular freshwater fish in the aquarium trade.

They are native to the tropical rainforest of South America and can be found in the tributaries of the Amazon River.

Neon Tetras are small fish, only growing to around 1.5 inches (3 cm) in length.

Despite their small size, they make a big impact in an aquarium with their bright blue and red bodies.

In the wild, Neon Tetras prefer a water temperature between 69 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit with a pH of 5.5 to 6.2.

They are omnivorous and will consume most types of food, but they do best when offered a high protein diet.

Further, they are schooling fish and should be kept in a group of six or more.

In general, Neon Tetras are hardy and easy to care for making them a popular choice for both beginner and experienced aquarists.

11. Black Phantom Tetra (Megalamphodus Megalopterus)

The Black Phantom Tetra is a freshwater fish native to  South America: Rio San Francisco headwaters, Brazil; Rio Guapore and upper Rio Paraguay basins in Bolivia and Brazil.

It is a member of the Characidae family and is also known as the Mega Tetra.

It has a black body with iridescent blue markings and can grow to a maximum length of 1.4 inches (3.5 cm).

The Black Phantom Tetra is a schooling fish and should be kept in groups of at least six.

It prefers a well-aerated, heavily planted tank with a temperature range of 72-80°F (20-26°C) with a pH level of 6.0 to 7.5.

The average lifespan of a Black Phantom tetra is around five years, and some may even live to be six years old.

It prefers freeze-dried or live foods such as Brine shrimp, bloodworms, and mosquito larvae.

It is a peaceful schooling fish that makes an excellent addition to a neighborhood aquarium.

12. Buenos Aires Tetra (Hyphessobrycon Anisitsi)

The Buenos Aires Tetra is a freshwater fish native to South America.

It is a popular aquarium fish introduced to other parts of the world.

The body is silvery green with a thin blue line that begins behind the gill and ends at the caudal (tail) fin, where there is a black diamond-shaped spot.

The fins are orange-red, and a little red may be seen on top of the eyes.

It grows to a maximum of about  2.8 inches (7 cm).

The Buenos Aires tetra is a hardy fish and can tolerate a wide range of water conditions.

It does best when water temperatures are between 23 and 27 degrees Celsius (72 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit), with a pH level in the range of 5.8 to 8.5.

They are omnivorous fish and will eat various foods, including live, frozen, or flake foods.

The Buenos Aires Tetra is a relatively peaceful fish and can be kept with other peaceful fish of similar size.

It is not recommended to keep them with fish that are much larger or much smaller than they are because they love to bite the fins of a long-finned fish.

You should be careful about choosing suitable Buenos Aires tetra tank mates for the tetras.

13. Glowlight Tetra (Hemigrammus Erythrozonus)

The Glowlight Tetras are indigenous to the Essequibo basin in Guyana; they are discovered in the Essequibo, Mazaruni, and Potaro Rivers.

They prefer habitats with plenty of vegetation and a slow water flow.

Also, they are small fish, typically measuring only 2 inches in length, and are a bright orange color with a black stripe running along their body.

When it comes to water conditions, they are quite reactive.

You must maintain a temperature of between 72 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit (22 and 27 degrees Celsius), with a pH level of 6.0 to 7.5.

In the wild, Glowlight Tetras feed on small insects, crustaceans, and other invertebrates. In captivity, they will accept a variety of foods, including flake food, pellets, and live or frozen foods

They are peaceful schooling fish and make good additions to community tanks, and can live to 3-4 years.

14. Lemon Tetra (Hyphessobrycon Pulchripinnis)

Lemon Tetra is native to South America and lives in parts of the Amazon River.

They most frequently live in small streams surrounding the Tapajós River basin in Brazil.

The majority of the species in this Tetra family have a diamond-shaped body. 

On the other hand, Lemons are typically deeper-bodied and more laterally compressed.

These fish are raised in clear, gentle streams with soothing and clean water.

So our water temperature must be between 72°F and 82°F, as well as a pH level of 5.5 to 8.0.

When fully grown, the average length of a lemon tetra is around two inches, and they can live up to four to eight years.

These fish are tiny, thus, they can be kept no matter how much space you have available.

Like many other tetra species, Lemons like to be in large groups.

The fish can become stressed and unhappy if they are alone, leading to future health issues.

15. Penguin Tetra (Thayeria Boehlkei)

Penguin Tetra are schooling fish found in South America, Rio Araguaia (Brazil), and the Peruvian Amazon.

They are a peaceful community fish that does well in a group of at least 6-8 individuals.

Their black bodies easily identify these little charmers with white stripes running vertically along each side.

The fins of the Penguin Tetra are also mostly clear with a slight orange hue. 

Males and females look very similar, but males tend to be slightly smaller than females and have more extended fins.

The average size of a single adult is 1.20 inches (3 cm), while the maximum length can reach 2.5 in (6.3 cm).

The Penguin Tetra prefers to live in water with a neutral pH of 6-8 and a water temperature between 72-82 degrees Fahrenheit.

If you provide them with the ideal water temperature, they live for around three to five years.

These fish are omnivorous and will eat various foods, including flakes, pellets, freeze-dried foods, and live/frozen foods.

It is essential to provide a well-rounded diet for the Penguin Tetra to ensure optimal health and coloration.

Penguin Tetras are not difficult to care for, but they require a bit of space to swim and plenty of hiding places.

They are not known to be fin nippers, but they may chase other fish that are smaller than them.

16. Blind Cave Mexican Tetra (Astyanax Mexicanus)

The Blind Cave Mexican Tetra (Astyanax Mexicanus) is a fish found in the caves of Mexico.

They are small fish; the average adult length is 3.5 inches (8.9 cm). 

Females are larger and more robust, with lengths up to 4 inches (10 cm). 

With proper care, they can live for 3 to 5 years.

They come in two varieties: one that is not blinded, which dwells on the surface, and another that is blind, which resides at the bottom of the caverns. They have no eyes and rely on other senses to navigate their surroundings since they have none.

This species thrives in water with a pH of 6.5 to 8, 30 to 35 dGH hardness, and a 20 to 25 degree range.

Blind cave tetras are peaceful fish that can become more aggressive as they grow older.

The blind variant, on the other hand, does not appear to be a schooling fish, but they do prefer to congregate in the water and thrive when maintained in groups of at least six.

They eat small invertebrates like insects and crustaceans.

They are hardy fish and can be kept in various aquariums.

However, they do best in a well-oxygenated tank with plenty of hiding places.

17. Ember Tetra (Hyphessobrycon Amandae)

The Ember tetra (Hyphessobrycon Amandae) is a small, brightly colored fish glowing orange-red coloration.

This species is native to the Araguaia River basin in Central Brazil, inhabiting slow-moving streams and ponds.

They are active swimmers and are particularly fond of swimming near the water’s surface. They typically grow to a length of less than an inch.

This fish is susceptible, so we should provide it with the best water parameters to avoid illness or death.

Water with a pH of 6.0-7.0 and a hardness of 5-17 dGH and a temperature range of 72-82°F (22 -28°C) is ideal for them.

They will consume almost any meal that comes their way, especially if it’s been freeze-dried or alive.

However, other high-quality food should form the basis of the diet, such as fish flakes, frozen, freeze-dried, and live foods like brine shrimp, bloodworms, and insects.

They’re schooling fish that enjoy swimming in groups, so there won’t be any issues if you add them to your tank.

However, be careful to put them with larger fish that might be aggressive toward them.

These beautiful fish can live from 2 to 4 years.

18. Silvertip Tetra (Hasemania Nana)

Silvertip tetras are small schooling fish that come from South America.

They are a beautiful silver color with black markings and a long, black tail.

These species are peaceful and do well in most community tanks; they also should be kept in groups of six or more.

They require a water temperature of 64°F to 82°F (around 72 to 74 degrees is ideal), and a pH of 6.0-8.0 to help them reach their full size(1.2 inches) and live for 5 to 8 years.

They will eat most types of food but prefer bloodworms, Daphnia, brine shrimp, and other meat-based foods.

19. Red Blue Columbian Tetra (Hyphessobrycon columbianus)

Red Blue Columbian Tetra is a freshwater fish that is native to Colombia.

It is a member of the Characidae family and is closely related to the Neon Tetra.

They have a bright red body with blue fins and a black stripe running along their side.

The Red-Blue Columbian Tetra is a peaceful fish but they can be aggressive, so avoid keeping them with fish that have larger fins to avoid fin nipping.

They may also bully smaller tank mates.

This fish can grow up to 2.6 inches in length and live for 3 to 5 years.

They like certain water conditions, such as a temperature range of 75°F to 80°F (24°C to 27°C), and a pH level of 6 to 7.

They are not picky eaters; they accept flake, frozen, freeze-dried, and live food.

Also, they do well in school (shoal) of 6 or more and may behave better if kept in schools.

20. Rosy Tetra / Serpae Tetra (Hyphessobrycon Rosaceus)

The rosy tetra makes an excellent addition to any community aquarium.

It is a peaceful fish that gets along well with other peaceful community fish.

They are found in South America of the Rio Guopore region of Paraguay along in the lower Amazon River Basin of Guyana, Surinam, and Brazil.

They prefer water with a temperature of 75-82°F (24-28°C) and a pH level of 5.5 to 7.5.

If you take care of them well, they can grow to 1.5 to 2 inches and live from 3 to 5 years.

They require a varied diet that includes high-quality flake, micropellets, and tiny frozen foods such as bloodworm, white mosquito larvae, vitamin-enriched brine shrimp, and Daphnia.

21. Rummy Nose Tetra (Hemigrammus Rhodostomus)

The Rummy Nose Tetra is a unique fish that can be found in the Amazon Basin. It belongs to the Characidae family and has a bright red coloration on its nose, making it popular among aquarium enthusiasts everywhere!

The body shape of these animals consists mainly of silver coloring with black stripes running along their length – just like an arranged zebra pattern.

Its name comes from the color of its head, which is a deep crimson.

These species are schooling fish and should be kept in groups of six or more.

They require particular water conditions, such as water temperature of 75-84°F, to match the Amazon’s tropical waters. pH must also be maintained at a certain level; it should be between 6.2 and 7.0, and the hardness level should be 2-10 KH.

With the proper care, they reach the size of 2.5 inches long and can live for 5 to 6 years with perfect health.

They are omnivores, so they would eat plant debris, small insects, larvae, or eggs in the wild.

They’d generally accept anything that could be crammed into their mouths.

22. Panda Tetra (Aphyocharax Paraguayensis)

Panda Tetra is a small, peaceful freshwater fish native to South America.

This little gem has been a favorite among aquarium hobbyists for many years due to its beautiful coloration and relatively easy care.

They are tiny silver-bodied fish with a pair of white and black markings on their anal fin and caudal peduncle.

These species are schooling fish, so they should be kept in groups of 6 or more, and they prefer to live in heavily planted tanks with plenty of hiding places.

Also, they are omnivorous and will eat the most prepared aquarium foods, but should also be given a variety of live, frozen, and vegetable-based foods for optimal health.

Panda Tetras are very sensitive to water parameters and should only be kept in well-maintained tanks, and if you provide them with the proper care, they can live for 5-6 Years.

They prefer a temperature range of 71.0° to 80.6° Fahrenheit (22° to 27° Celsius) and a pH between 5.5 – 7.5.

These fish are certain to bring beauty and color to your tank, but you should consider that they are fin-nipping fish.

23. Black Neon Tetra (Hyphessobrycon Herbertaxelrodi)

The Black Neon Tetra is a small, brightly colored fish popular in the aquarium hobby.

Their striking black and white horizontal stripes and peaceful nature make them a great minimalist addition to any community aquarium. 

They are members of the Characidae family and can be found in the wild in South America.

These fish typically grow to a size of about 1,57 inches and their lifespan is about 3-5 years.

They’ll eat commercial fish flakes and pellet mixes; however, a little variety is advised; you may add frozen foods like mosquito larvae or even live foods to their diet.

They prefer water temperatures in the range of 68-82.5 degrees Fahrenheit and a pH of 5.5-7.5.

These species are active fish that requires a well-oxygenated aquarium with plenty of hiding places and should also be kept in groups of at least six individuals.

This fish is a great addition to any aquarium and is sure to bring color and activity to your tank and can be kept with a wide variety of community tankmates.

24. Albino Cardinal Tetra

Albino cardinal tetras are a rare type of fish that is only found in the wild in a few places.

They are bright white with red stripes, and they have a very unique look that makes them stand out from other fish.

Because they are so rare, they can be quite expensive to buy, but they are worth the price if you are looking for a fish that is truly one of a kind.

Albino cardinal tetras need a lot of care. They prefer to live in a school of six or more fish,  and they need a tank that is at least 20 gallons.

They are omnivorous, like most of the tetras fish. This means that they will gladly accept both cucumber or pea entrees and meaty items like bloodworms or brine shrimp.

They are not picky eaters and will eat both frozen and live treats. However, their core diet should consist of high-quality flakes or pellets for tropical fish.

Also, they are sensitive to changes in water quality, so it is important to keep a close eye on their water conditions and provide them with water temperatures of 75- to 80- degrees Fahrenheit.

The Amazon basin’s blackwater streams are home to these species, and so the water must be acidic (between 5.5 and 6.5 on the pH scale) if they are going to thrive.

With proper care, they can reach  an average size of around two inches in length when fully grown and can live from 2 to 5 years.

They are peaceful fish, but they can be nippy, so it is important to keep an eye on them if you have other fish in the tank.

25. Bucktooth Tetra (Exodon paradoxus)

The bucktooth tetras are native to Brazil and Guyana, and they can inhabit clear, fast-flowing streams and tributaries in the Amazon River basin.

The average bucktooth tetra size is around four to five inches when kept in captivity.

 However, in the wild, they can reach up to six inches in length.

Unlike most tetra, bucktooth tetra can be violent towards any other fish in the vicinity.

They are one of several scale-eating species. That’s why they need special treatment, and to be aware of the tank mates you put them within the same aquarium.

The bucktooth aren’t too demanding when it comes to water parameters.

They prefer temperatures between 72°F and 82°F with a water hardness of 0 to 15 KH and pH levels of 5.5 to 7.5 (ideal slightly acidic).

They are omnivorous feeders, and their diet should consist mainly of meaty food.

Brine shrimp, bloodworms, and tubifex worms make good food choices for them.

You must maintain a large group of them so that they may gang up and avoid attacking one another.

Also, with the proper care, they can live for about ten years.

26. Emperor Tetra (Nematobrycon Palmeri)

The Emperor Tetra is found in slow-moving waters, such as flooded areas, lakes, and streams.

They are native to Colombia’s freshwater Atrato and San Juan River basins in South America.

They are very active fish and do their best in an aquarium with plenty of hiding places; also, they are schooling fish and should be kept in groups of at least six.

The fish’s body is blue-gray with mauve hues, and it has an almost iridescent shine.

A dark line runs vertically from front to back, while the body below is lighter in color.

Also, they have yellow fins with a black border; these fins get crimson where they join the body.

Their diet consists of insects, larvae, crustaceans, and small mollusks in the wild.

So, they should be given a varied diet in the aquarium that includes both live and frozen foods and flakes or pellets.

They prefer water parameters with a water Temperature of 73 to 81 F (23 to 27 C)and water pH from 5.0 to 7.8.

The average length of an Emperor Tetra’s 1.5 – 2  inches when they are fully grown, and with the proper care, they can live for around 3-5 years.

They are a beautiful addition to your aquarium, and they provide an excellent view while they swim with their lovely hues.

27. Serpae Tetra

Serpae Tetra is a tropical fish that originates in the Amazon basin, inhabiting the Guaporé and Paraguay River basins in Argentina, Brazil, and upper Paraguay.

It is a popular aquarium fish and is easily recognized by its bright red coloration.

The body of the Serpae Tetra is long and slender, and it has a long, flowing tail.

The fins are also brightly colored, except for the black stripe that runs along the back of the fish.

They are peaceful fish and can be kept in community aquariums with other non-aggressive fish, and they do best when kept in small schools of at least six fish, and it will become stressed if kept alone.

They prefer bright, warm water, so their ideal water temperature is from 72 to 79 F (22 to 26 C), pH level from 5.0 to 7.8, and water hardness from 5 to 25 dGH.

These species can reach a length of 1.75 inches (7 cm), and with the proper care, they can live up to 5 years or more.

They are not particularly huge fish, so it’s a fantastic addition to your aquarium, bringing more enjoyment and pleasure.

However, keep in mind that they may be fin nipping the smaller species or fin nipping one another.

28. False Neon Tetra

The False Neon Tetra are native to the Upper Negro River basin, Brazil, and the Orinoco River basin in Colombia & Venezuela.

These fish are generally a silver color with a bright blue stripe that runs down their body.

They get their name from its vibrant blue stripes, which can be mistaken for neon lights.

They require a water temperature of 24-27 degrees Celsius (75-81 degrees Fahrenheit), with a pH level of 5.5-6.5

They also eat everything that fits in their mouths, so they can eat both dry food and live food and flakes.

The average lifespan in the wild is ten years, and in an aquarium, they can survive for around five years.

They are active, peaceful fish that are no threat to other species in the tank.

Just keep them in a group because they are shoaling fish.

Last Words

So, there you have it, a comprehensive guide on the different types of Tetras.

Keep in mind that each species has its own specific needs in terms of water temperature, pH levels, and diet, so do your research before adding any of these fish to your aquarium.

We hope you enjoyed reading this article and found it helpful in your quest to learn more about these beautiful fish.

If you still have any questions, please feel free to leave us a comment below.